Dog Walks

 

Bridlington Area Walks

The table below contains information on all walks centred in the bridlington area. Click on any walk's name or reference code to see more details on the walk, including photos and a route map.

 

Summary

Walk Name   North Landing - Thornwick - Flamborough

Ref  Choose from two circular walks, both of which start at the picturesque inlet of North Landing.

Details

Circular Walk    Yes

Grade      Moderate

Walk Type      Coast and Beach Walks

Car Parking Facility  North Landing or Thornwick Bay

Refreshments   Café and bar in North Landing

Public Conveniences     Flamborough, North Landing

Distance

Distance (Miles)    4

Distance (Kilometres)   6.4

Lengthened Distance (Miles)  4

Shortened Distance (Miles)  1

Description

  • From North Landing, follow the cliff top path across the inlet known as Holmes Gut.  You can see many of the caves from here, along with a small brick construction set near the top of the cliff.  This was a gunpowder store for the two forty pounder guns once kept at Flamborough for the defence of the area.

  • You soon reach Thornwick Bay.  From the cafe enjoy fine views of the three large caves: Smugglers Cave, the largest on the east coast of England, Church Cave and ThornWick Cave.  The large bay is Thomwick Bay and the small one is Little Thornwick Bay.  (Thor was the Danish God of thunder and it is named after him).

  • You can walk between the bays at low tide.  Indeed, a natural amphitheatre exists, with many rock pools waiting to be explored. These are a delight for young children, if not for the crabs!

  • The next bay is Chatterthrow Bay.  Beware: the only entrance and exit is through the large rock arch.  You cannot climb up the cliff and you will be stranded until the tide goes out again if you are not careful.

  • You may return along the cliff top path or the road from the cafe.  Alternatively, continue along the high cliffs until you reach a field footpath leading southwards to Flamborough village.  From the village take the road leading back to North Landing.

Location

Start Point   North Landing

End Point      North Landing

Towns & Villages    Bempton, Flamborough and Marton

Further Information

Features of Interest

-  There has been a lifeboat station protecting the water around the cliffs since 1871 and the boards inside tell of lives saved and lost.  Although launching the boat today can still be dangerous, try to picture it not all that long ago when it was an open boat and rowed through the heavy swell, the volunteers clad only in oilskins with a cork life-belt for safety.  Although only a few cobbles sail from here today, at one time there were 80.  The catch was landed on the beach and auctioned, the buyers giving their own nods and winks.  It was then taken up the cliff by donkeys and packed into boxes or barrels before being transported to Hull by train.  Many local people still remember this and will always tell you their story.  The boats were hauled up the slipway and old photos depict a busy and colourful sight, now sadly gone.   

-  Rock pools are exposed at low tide and are a delight for young children, if not for crabs!  Several large caves can be explored but be careful and make sure that you know where your children are.  The tide comes in the caves from behind and, as the rocks shelve upwards from the beach, many people are cut off every year.  Sadly some people have drowned.  It is not advisable to explore the rocks at the western side of the cove as this is where most people get cut off and rock falls occur.

-  Robin Lythe is mentioned in the book 'Mary Anerley', written by R. D. Blackmore of 'Lorna Doone' fame.  The book tells of smuggling exploits in this part of England, and they are easy to imagine as you view this secluded cove away from the village.  Tea, brandy, tobacco, silk and cotton ware all smuggled in at one time.  A typical tale is that of a ship moored off the headland signalling that a man on board had died.  A coffin was sent out and duly returned.  A solemn procession was led through the village, watched over by the preventive men (Customs), and the coffin left overnight for burial the next day.  It was buried, but then full of stones instead of........? Some of the older cottages are said to have hidden cupboards that defied the searches of the Customs men.

Accessibility Information

This route:-

-  contains some steep slopes.

-  contains a mixture of stiles, steps and gates.

-  may involve walking through fields with livestock.

-  crosses at least one road.

-  contains surfaces which can be boggy in wet weather.

-  contains some uneven surfaces.

Additional Information

-  Please take extreme care if you explore the bays.  It is easy to get cut off by tides, and sadly people have drowned in recent years.






 

Fraisthorpe Beach, Bridlington

Fraisthorpe Beach, Bridlington
  • Fraisthorpe Beach, Bridlington
  • Fraisthorpe Beach, Bridlington

Many years back Fraisthorpe was a nudist beach. Thankfully, especially in British weather, dog walkers have taken over and this is one of the few beaches dogs are allowed all year round. Both winter and summer walks here are lovely. I almost don't want to share it, it's that good!

You'll be taken off the main A road onto a single lane that winds through farm land. Arrive early and pay a few pounds to park on the farmland next to the beach, a man should be sitting in a hut to take your cash. There are basic public toilets here, so take advantage before setting off walking. The tide stretches out giving literally miles of sand for your dog to play. You'll share the beach with plenty of other dogs, along with horse riders, kite surfers and people fishing for Razor Clams. It never feels crowded because of the space, so you can be as sociable as you like.

A nice 3 mile walk straight up the coast will find you right on Bridlington's main beach. Here you'll have to pop the dog on the lead but it's the perfect rest point for good old fish and chips and mini doughnuts, in true British seaside style. Take a stroll back down to Fraisthorpe in the afternoon, but check the tides - we've been caught sometimes and had to take the path along the fields at the beach edge to get back to the car!

There are only one or two bins for your dog litter, so be prepared to carry to Bridlington or back up on the beach car park. Pack a towel to pat down your dog before he gets in the car, you will take half the beach home otherwise. Remember plenty of fresh water for them, especially if they are like mine and can't resist a drink of salty seawater. Hope you enjoy the walk as much as we do!

  • Off Lead Area

    Off lead areas here. Time to stretch those legs!

  • Toilets

    Don't get caught short here, toilets available!



     

  • Walk Features
  • Location Features
    • Flat Walk

      Take it easy! This is a mainly a flat walk.

    • Beach Walk

      Sand, Sea, surf, and probably a wet dog!

    • Pathed Route

      No need for wellies! This walk has pathed routes.



       

  • Address Details
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2 COMMENTS
  1. Docsusiefoss avatar

    Docsusiefos

    We spent a lovely day introducing our 16 week labradoodle puppy to the delights of beach walks. It is beautiful, huge beach and huge sky. Highly recommended

    18 September 2012

  2. damamachs avatar

    damamach

    Excellent walk ... will definitely revisit. Car park was a bargain at only £2. Pooch loved the walk and so did we!!


















Bridlington Beach South

Distance:
2 miles aprox
Duration:
As long as you like
Level of walk:
Easy
Bridlington Beach

Why you should do this walk…

If you want to stretch your pooch’s legs on a vast flat beach and enjoy a bracing seaside walk. Obviously there’s the opportunity for a swim too. You and your pooch can blow the cobwebs away, be it windy, sunny or raining and you can both be as laid back or as energetic as you like here.

What else you need to know

The beach is open to you and your dog from 1 October to 30 April.

The busiest area of the beach; from the south pier to a line extending east from Kingston Road is closed to dogs from 1 May to 30 September. The signs are very clear.

How to get there – from the A165 Hull to Bridlington road (Kingsgate), follow Kingston Road or Shaftsbury Road towards South Marine Drive.

Car park – Pay and Display street parking on South Marine Drive near the Spa theatre. At busier holiday times, it may be easier to use one of the main car parks in Bridlington.

Start – from the Spa theatre, head first for the promenade then southwards along the beach. At peak holiday times when dogs are not allowed on the beach near the theatre, simply walk further along the promenade before making for the sands.

Length/time – as long as you like

Terrain/difficulty – EASY, fine flat sand, the beach is very clean and easy to walk on.

Dog friendliness – great beach to run around, normally not busy in the winter.  Dog bins available near the beach.

Food and drink – nearest dog friendly pub is the Ship Inn at Sewerby, see Directories for details.

Public toilets available in Bridlington.

Other interesting info:

Bridlington was a popular holiday destination for West Yorkshire workers and the first hotel was opened in 1805. Much later in 1846 a railway station was opened between the Quay and the town.  The town was brought up to date in 1995 when a new Spa Promenade was opened.

The port still has a lucrative export markets for shell fish to France, Spain and Italy, said to be worth several million pounds a year.

 





 












































 

Flamborough Head

 
Distance:
3 miles
Duration:
1 hour
Level of walk:
Easy
Flamborough Head

Why you should do this walk…

If you love coastal walks, stunning scenery, and lighthouses and want your dog to be able to have a good run too, then this exhilarating walk might just be the one for you.  This short circular walk takes you on a mini-tour of one of the most spectacular areas of chalk cliffs in Britain.

What else you need to know

How to get there – take the B1255 Flamborough road from Bridlington and as the road bears left entering the village, turn right along the B1259 – Lighthouse Road.

Suggested map – OS Explorer 301 Scarborough, Bridlington & Flamborough Head

Car park – pay and display by the Flamborough Lighthouse

Start – at the lighthouse, by the Flamborough Headland information board

Length/time – 3 miles, about 1 hour

Terrain/difficulty – EASY, mostly uses clear grassy paths, and ends along a quiet road

Dog friendliness – although a coastal walk there are plenty of wide open spaces, meaning your pooch can have a good run around safely away from the cliff edge. There are no stiles to climb, but dogs need to be under close control at times.

Food and drink – The Ship Inn just down the coast at Sewerby is dog-friendly.  See Directories for details.

Public toilets –at the car park by the lighthouse.

Other interesting info:

The Flamborough Head Lighthouse is open for tours.  It has four white flashes every 15 seconds.

The Walk

  1. Start at the lighthouse by the Flamborough Headland information board. Turn to the right and head towards the Fog Signal station, keeping a wall to the right and a fence to the left – beyond this are the cliffs and sea. Join a track heading towards the signal station and make for one of the many green paths cut into the rugged grasslands, which criss-cross the area. Keeping the signal station to the left, head towards the coastline – there is plenty of dog romping space here.
  2. Keeping the coast line to the left, head southwards along the path. There are waymarker posts and information notices from the local authority warning everyone to take care by the cliff edges.
  3. Just after a small wooden footbridge, turn right at a waymarked public footpath sign for Lighthouse Road (¾ mile). Head inland along the edge of a field keeping the hedge and tree line to the right. As the path crosses the field, fleeting glimpses of the old and current Flamborough lighthouses can be seen through the hedgerows.
  4. At the end of the field climb a flight of wooden steps up to Lighthouse Road. Cross the road and head back into Flamborough using the roadside path. Close views are available of the old lighthouse on the edge of the golf course to the left, before the modern version comes into view ahead.

Flamborough Head to
North Landing


Distance:   4 miles








Duration:1½ hours
Level of walk:
Easy

 
North Landing Beach

Why you should do this walk…

This exhilarating short walk takes you to the peaceful cove beach at North Landing, set snugly within the chalk cliffs of Flamborough Head.  Perfect if your pooch likes a swim and you fancy relaxing on the beach for a while.  This coastal walk is stunning and your well behaved dog will enjoy being off lead on all but the sections where the path runs closest to the cliff edge.

What else you need to know

How to get there – take the B1255 Flamborough road from Bridlington and as the road bears left entering the village, turn right along the B1259 Lighthouse Road.

Suggested map – OS Explorer 301 Scarborough, Bridlington & Flamborough Head

Car park – Pay and Display by the Flamborough Lighthouse

Start – at the lighthouse, by the Flamborough Headland information board

Length/time – 4 miles and 1½ hours

Terrain/difficulty – EASY, mostly along clear grassy paths, with some steps at the start and finish

Dog friendliness – although a coastal walk there are plenty of wide open spaces, meaning your pooch can have a good run around safely away from  the cliff edge. There are no stiles to climb, but dogs need to be under close control at times.

Food and drink – there is a cafe at North Landing which has a partly undercover area at the front and The Ship Inn just down the coast at Sewerby is dog-friendly.  See Directories for details.

Public toilets –at the car park by the lighthouse.

Other interesting info:

The chalk lighthouse on the golf course at Flamborough Head was built in 1674 and is the oldest complete lighthouse in England.

 

The Walk

  1. Start at the lighthouse by the Flamborough Headland information board. Turn to the left and head across the green area in front of the benches, with the sea to the right. Pass the historical maritime warning beacon and head for the waymarked stone steps ahead. Follow the steps downhill to the left and at the junction of paths keep basically ahead before bearing right and uphill along the coastline.
  2. The route passes the perimeter of a golf course and is marked by a fence made of wooden posts. The path is clear and easy to walk on. Your pooch will be fine off the lead on these sections most of the time, but use judgement when the path skirts the cliff edges.
  3. On the approach to North Landing, there is a wide green area with plenty of space for a good romp round. The path then heads inland towards a residential area before dropping down to North Landing with its beautiful boat launching area – there are caves here too. Access to the sea is via a steep winding slip-road, which may be a bit of a slog to some – but your dog will love it just as Izzy did.
  4. When ready, return to Flamborough by retracing the outward route along cliff top path.

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